Community number 1: Piscacucho

We spent the past week designing the project, and came up with some key questions that we're hoping to answer over the next two months, such as: Where exactly does Sacred Valley Health work? Where do people seek care within their communities? Who in the community utilizes the promotores services? How can we communicate the work of Sacred Valley Health through maps?

Using handheld GPS’, our team will take the exact location of each household in the promotores communities. We anticipate that collecting this geographic information will allow us to visualize data at the household level, and help plan the trainings and campaigns more efficiently. As we move around the communities, we are also conducting a basic survey, asking families about the ages and genders of household residents, their water source, which health center they frequent, and whether or not they have a chimney and a latrine.

A typical well found in a family's home

A typical well found in a family's home

The first community that we’re mapping is Piscacucho, a large, more westernized community that lies at the meeting place for the Inca Trail, known as “kilometer 82.” Our team spent Monday and Tuesday collecting points with promotores (community health workers) Pedro and Sirilio, as well as Laticia, the wonderful registered nurse. Some households were more concentrated along the road, while others required us to hike much further up the mountain. People were generally very excited about the project, and we got In total, we were able to collect the location of about 100 families in two days! So speedy. Over the next few days, we’ll be working to sort the data and make some example maps before moving on to the next communities! 

Hannah, Laticia, Anna and Emmy in Piscacucho

Hannah, Laticia, Anna and Emmy in Piscacucho